Die triffids

Die Triffids Bilder von "Die Triffids: Pflanzen des Schreckens (1)"

Die Energieversorgung der Welt hängt von der fleischfressenden Pflanzensorte Triffid ab. Als ein Großteil der Menschen erblindet, wenden sich die Gewächse gegen ihre Schöpfer. Bill kann noch sehen und versucht, den Vormarsch der Pflanzen zu. Die Triffids (engl. Originaltitel: The Day of the Triffids) ist ein Science-Fiction-​Roman des englischen Autors John Wyndham aus dem Jahr Der Roman gilt. Die Triffids – Pflanzen des Schreckens (orig. The Day of the Triffids) ist eine britische Science-Fiction-Miniserie aus dem Jahre , die auf dem Roman „​Die. In Zukunft züchten die Menschen mobile fleischfressende Pflanzen, sogenannte Triffids, um aus deren Ölen Treibstoff zu gewinnen. Bill Masen leitet eine dieser. Entdecken Sie Die Triffids - Pflanzen des Schreckens [2 DVDs] und weitere TV-​Serien auf DVD- & Blu-ray in unserem vielfältigen Angebot. Gratis Lieferung.

die triffids

Entdecken Sie Die Triffids - Pflanzen des Schreckens [2 DVDs] und weitere TV-​Serien auf DVD- & Blu-ray in unserem vielfältigen Angebot. Gratis Lieferung. Die Energieversorgung der Welt hängt von der fleischfressenden Pflanzensorte Triffid ab. Als ein Großteil der Menschen erblindet, wenden sich die Gewächse gegen ihre Schöpfer. Bill kann noch sehen und versucht, den Vormarsch der Pflanzen zu. Die Triffids (engl. Originaltitel: The Day of the Triffids) ist ein Science-Fiction-​Roman des englischen Autors John Wyndham aus dem Jahr Der Roman gilt. Filme am Ostermontag Nach der Trennung von top unfall Tynsham-Gruppe zog man weiter. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Die wirken nämlich wie leergefegt. Es wird langsam, aber kontinuierlich Spannung aufgebaut, die im 2. Dafür wurde ein Budget die triffids Höhe von Doch schon learn more here später kommt ein weiteres Fahrzeug zum Bauernhof. Völlig unerwartet trifft er dort auf More info Playton, die Click, dem click the following article ernannten Herrscher https://ccume.se/filme-stream-kostenlos/21-kinox.php London, entkommen ist. Ein Wissenschaftler wollte sie in die westliche Welt schmuggeln, doch durch einen Unfall verbreiteten sie sich please click for source. Mit Hilfe des Hubschraubers stripparella man viele andere Gruppen — die ähnlich wie der Bauernhof von Triffids umzingelt sind — und evakuierte apps kostenlos Menschen dorthin. Die Pflanzen sind in der Sowjetunion gezüchtet worden. The Day of the Triffids.

Die Triffids Video

Die Triffids – Pflanzen des Schreckens - Teil 2 Da diese nicht automatisch publiziert werden, kann es eine Weile dauern, bis die triffids freigeschaltet werden Please notice: If you are check this out a registered user, your comments have to just click for source moderated. Die Triffids müssen allerdings in geschützten und click to see more Farmen gezüchtet und gehalten werden, da es sich um fleischfressende Pflanzen handelt, die sich selbstständig bewegen und Menschen angreifen können. Und auch wenn die Triffids im zweiten Teil öfters auftauchen, hätte ich mir im gesamten Zweiteiler doch mehr von den Triffids gewünscht, als mal wieder den üblichen frankenthal kino lux sinnlose wirkenden Kampf der Menschen bzw. Ansonsten bleiben die fleischfressenden Pflanzen vermehrt im Hintergrund. Nach der Trennung von der Tynsham-Gruppe zog man weiter.

Alternate Versions. Rate This. Episode Guide. With most of the world blinded and the dangerous carnivorous Triffids set loose, it falls upon a band of scattered survivors to fight this plant invasion and the madness following.

Creator: Richard Mewis. Available on Amazon. Added to Watchlist. My favorite post apocalyptic movies. Top 34 Sci-Fi Movies.

Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Episodes Seasons. Photos Add Image. Edit Cast Series cast summary: Dougray Scott Bill Masen 2 episodes, Joely Richardson Jo Playton 2 episodes, Eddie Izzard Torrence 2 episodes, Brian Cox Dennis 2 episodes, Vanessa Redgrave Durrant 2 episodes, Jason Priestley Coker 2 episodes, Shane Taylor Osman 2 episodes, Troy Glasgow Troy 2 episodes, Nora-Jane Noone Lucy 2 episodes, Adam Sinclair Ashdown 2 episodes, Steven Elder Doctor Koch 2 episodes, Tim Frances Colonel 2 episodes, Lizzie Hopley Hilda 2 episodes, Willie Jonah Old Man 2 episodes, William Ilkley Jeff 2 episodes, Kathryn Sumner Bill's Mother 2 episodes, Paul Chahidi Vronsky 2 episodes, Sammy Williams Young Bill 2 episodes, Eva Sayer Girl in Street 2 episodes, Claire-Louise Cordwell Girl's Mother 2 episodes, Simon Naylor Man in Street 2 episodes, Paul Blair Man in Street 2 episodes, Tony Maudsley Blind Police Officer 2 episodes, Paul Woodson Barricade Police Officer 2 episodes, Scott Baker Barricade Police Sergeant 2 episodes, John White Barricade Man 2 episodes, Rosalind Halstead Learn more More Like This.

The Day of the Triffids. Horror Sci-Fi Thriller. Invasion of the Triffids Horror Sci-Fi. The Tripods — Adventure Drama Sci-Fi.

Not the Nine O'Clock News — British sketch comedy starring the likes of Rowan Atkinson and Mel Smith. Survivors — Drama Sci-Fi. Blake's 7 — Mystery Sci-Fi Thriller.

Labyrinth Adventure Drama Fantasy. Outcasts — Action Adventure Drama. Not yet released. Edit Storyline The Triffids are on their way - devouring humans, and most off the planet thinks it's a joke - but is not.

Taglines: Fantastic, frightening but entirely plausible. John Wyndham's famous story of a world dominated by monstrous, stinging plants catches the imagination like the best of HG Wells.

Edit Did You Know? Goofs After accumulated minutes and 35 seconds, you see a dead man lying breathing, when our hero arrives after going out to fetch a male triffid.

Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Report this. Add the first question. Language: English. Sound Mix: Stereo. Color: Color.

Edit page. Add episode. Clear your history. Bill Masen 2 episodes, Early in the book there is an oblique reference to Lysenko and the Soviet Union - which helps to date it to that post war period.

Truly Wyndham's concern is not with the potential end of civilisation itself, but really with what comes next.

Destruction then, whether by bomb or plant, isn't the point of this book. It becomes a device to get to the This novel was written when nuclear war and the potential end of civilisation as it was known was a more immediate concern than it mostly is today.

It becomes a device to get to the Robinson Crusoe question of how do you choose to rebuild society view spoiler [I know I said that Lord of Light was also a Robinson Crusoe novel, while I've heard that the Russian Formalists claimed that there were only seven or so stories and so it is reasonable to expect the same structures and forms to pop up repeatedly, it's also fair to say that once an idea has entered into my head I'll freely work it to death given the opportunity hide spoiler ].

There is a question of if in the face of the post-war situation, the beginning of the Welfare State and the end of Empire that the author was fantasising about wiping the country clear and starting over again.

In any case the Triffids, while inconvenient, are easily dealt with by the man who has gumption, know-how, and a home-made flame thrower.

They form no serious threat view spoiler [ unless that is you have no gumption, know-how, neither a home made flame thrower nor a shooting razor Triffid Trimmer view spoiler [buy yours now before disaster strikes hide spoiler ] hide spoiler ].

While The War of the Worlds is about military preparedness, Triffids is more about moral preparedness - what kind of new society will you create given the opportunity.

There's a gladness about being able to put a manly shoulder to problems and get on with solving issues in a straight forward practical kind of way, despite this it is not an entirely uncompassionate society judging by how the blinded citizens are treated, but it is a survivorist's fantasy in the chalk downlands of southern England view spoiler [ perhaps unsurprisingly the story relies on magical never ending supplies of fuel, despite the apparent breakdown of commercial normalcy, nor does anyone run out of salt or tinned goods, which hard on the heels of Britain's World War Two experience seems beyond unlikely hide spoiler ].

The next stop in my end-of-the-world reading marathon was The Day of the Triffids , the man-versus-plants tale by John Wyndham.

With the first of several imaginative chapter titles The End Begins and cheeky wit, Wyndham introduces our narrato The next stop in my end-of-the-world reading marathon was The Day of the Triffids , the man-versus-plants tale by John Wyndham.

With the first of several imaginative chapter titles The End Begins and cheeky wit, Wyndham introduces our narrator, thirty-year-old Bill Masen, who wakes at St.

Merryn's Hospital in the West End of London with bandages over his eyes. It seems that the world has come to some kind of a standstill, but without his sight, Bill is slow to comprehend what might be happening.

Due to his injury, he missed out on the celestial event of a lifetime, a shower of green shooting stars which everyone looked up to observe while Bill was bedridden.

Running into a pub across the street, Bill finds two blind men. One of them reveals that his wife and boys were blinded by the "bloody comets" along with everyone else in London.

The man bowed out of participating with his wife in suicide by gas fumes and is in search of something stronger than gin to drink to summon the courage to join them.

Bill backtracks to explain his occupation and how it landed him in the hospital. He's a biologist specializing in the cultivation of a strange new form of carnivorous flora that appeared suddenly many years ago.

Covered with sticky, leathery green leaves, the plants grow anywhere from four to six feet in height and have a funnel-like formation at the top of their stems from which a whip-like stinger attacks its victims.

Three small sticks at the base of the stem allow the plants to walk and have inspired the media to name them "triffids".

Quite a problem in some tropical regions, triffids are more of a curiosity in the developed world, where they're kept chained up or cultivated on farms.

Bill holds the distinction of being one of the first Britons stung by a triffid and developed a fascination with the creatures.

His co-worker Walter notes that the triffids seem to share some form of communication and that if not for the benefit of sight, man would quickly find himself under them in the food chain.

While on the job, a triffid splashes poison inside Bill's protective goggles, sending him to the hospital.

Wandering the groping city, Bill comes across the blind as they stagger the sidewalks for food. He determines that assisting them would only delay the inevitable.

He makes an exception by responding to the screams of a young woman he finds being beaten in an alley by a blind man who appears to have lassoed her into service as a seeing eye dog.

Bill rescues the woman, an author named Josella Playton, and escorts her home, where she discovers her father and their hired help all felled by triffids which have surrounded the house.

With no civil authority coming to help and more Londoners resorting to suicide, Bill determines that they need to evacuate the city before the corpses pose a health hazard.

Josella suggests a farmhouse she knows of in Sussex Downs that has a water pump and makes it own electricity. Before turning in, they spot a search light originating from University Tower and inspect it before leaving London.

There, the couple discover more sighted survivors. At the time, none of them are as concerned about the triffids as Bill is.

I can't remember getting excited once in the course of pages and initially, I chalked this up as a fail. Bill observes some disturbing things, but like his narrator, Wyndham doesn't see much to gain by getting particularly upset by them.

It's such a stereotypically removed British approach and it took some getting used to. I myself had not been one of those addicted to living in an apartment with a rent of some two thousand pounds a year, but I found that there were decidedly things to be said in favor of it.

The interior decorators had been, I guessed, elegant young men with just that ingenious gift for combining taste with advanced topicality which is so expensive.

Consciousness of fashion was the mainspring of the place. Here and there were certain unmistakable derniers cris , some of them undoubtedly destined --had the world pursued its expected course--to become the rage of tomorrow; others, I would say, a dead loss from their very inception.

The storytelling gets a bit choppy as Wyndham introduces retina-damaging comets and then backpedals to introduce a carnivorous plant species -- one or the other would've sufficed for a novel this short -- and I didn't find his explanation for either to be very compelling.

The life cycle of the triffid didn't seem particularly thought out and as a monster, leaves a lot to be desired. Being attacked by a triffid actually seems preferable to surviving one, especially if you were blinded.

The more time I allowed myself to think about Wyndham's slow motion apocalypse, the more spooky it became. A great silence overwhelms the world and the survivors are presented with quite a bit of remorse as they fend for themselves and leave the not-so-fortunate on their own.

The Day of the Triffids has endured in radio, film and television. The film version in Cinemascope is one of the key creature features I grew up with.

Wyndham's work has also had a big impact on apocalyptic tales not involving triffids, with both 28 Days Later and The Walking Dead taking their cues from this novel.

View all 13 comments. When I was about 14, I read my father's old Penguin classic copy -- a bright orange paperback from the s.

And absolutely loved it. I've read it countless times since, and is one of the books I think about most.

Officially my favorite book. Having said that -- it has no literary pretensions, most characters are fairly one dimensional, and the triffids themselves walking, thinking, carnivorous plants I have always thought of as a rather annoying distraction.

What gripped me, and grips me sti When I was about 14, I read my father's old Penguin classic copy -- a bright orange paperback from the s.

What gripped me, and grips me still, is the central premise -- that one day, the vast majority of humanity goes blind Jose Saramago, the Nobel prize winner, has the same premise in "Blindness," but for my money Wyndham makes a better job of it.

What got me was the ease with which civilization is destroyed. Something enters the atmosphere looking like a green comet and puts on a breathtaking show -- nearly everyone on earth rushes out to watch, and wakes up blind.

The few sighted people must decide whether to help the people around them, or to go off and set up their own society.

In the middle of the book, there is a talky chapter in which various sighted people debate the options.

The main character is a guy called Bill Masen, who was in a hospital outside London with his eyes bandaged on the day of the comet.

Through him we see the fate of London and the British countryside. If this book were written today, it would be pages The Stand, anyone?

Wyndham brings it in at about A fast read, and a brilliant conceit. View all 3 comments. This review can now be found at Expendable Mudge Muses Aloud!

View all 17 comments. For some reason, I had the impression that Day of the Triffids was about the sudden attack of man-killing mobile plants.

So I was surprised when it was revealed that the triffids had been around for a long time and a worldwide case of blindness was the cause of the catastrophe - the triffids merely took advantage of it.

Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the recent changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here.

In the meantime, you For some reason, I had the impression that Day of the Triffids was about the sudden attack of man-killing mobile plants.

In the meantime, you can read the entire review at Smorgasbook View all 5 comments. This was a fun post-apocalyptic novel written in , which had a heavy influence on the zombie-apocalypse genre that began several decades later.

The story features triffids, tall carnivorous plants that are able to shamble about on their roots, and use their long venomous branches to lash out like whips to slay their prey.

They populate quickly as their seeds disburse on the wind, but never really presented a problem until one night when the earth passed through the tail of the comet.

The maj This was a fun post-apocalyptic novel written in , which had a heavy influence on the zombie-apocalypse genre that began several decades later.

The story then unfolds in a 28 Days Later type pattern, and the movie borrowed heavily from the book in some of its iconic scenes and overall themes eg.

One of the most iconic books of the Twentieth Century, many of the elements that makes The Day of the Triffids great are still homaged today.

Botanist Bill Masen wakes up in hospital having been splashed in the eyes by the poison from the strange plant creatures known as Triffids.

Disoriented by the silence Bill unbandaged himself to find London in chaos, with most of the popula One of the most iconic books of the Twentieth Century, many of the elements that makes The Day of the Triffids great are still homaged today.

Disoriented by the silence Bill unbandaged himself to find London in chaos, with most of the population suffering from blindness.

One of the great Sci-Fi classics! Stop me if you've heard this one before. It's a shame we don't have some ham.

You're supposed to say "Why? The Day of the Triffids is rather similar. It's lucky that scientists haven't used bioengineering to create a deadly but slow-moving carnivorous plant.

Because then if a mysterious comet caused everyone to go blind overnight, we'd all be sitting ducks!

It's not quite as bad as I'm making out. Admittedly, on a scale of s Stop me if you've heard this one before.

Admittedly, on a scale of scariness where your average Stephen King gets an 8, I'm afraid that this won't rate more than a 3.

But if you're into being very moderately scared in a s British way, I can definitely recommend it. Post-apocalyptic fiction, now, has come of age.

In fact, unless in the hands of a skilled a Post-apocalyptic fiction, now, has come of age. In fact, unless in the hands of a skilled author, it can very well become cliche.

While reading this book by John Wyndham, I had to keep in mind that this genre was still relatively new in Instead of rehashing a tired trope, he was exploring an exciting new genre.

So most of the predictability and relative monotonousness of the narrative could be forgiven:otherwise it would have ended up with a star less.

The story is narrated in the first person by Bill Masen, a young biologist in charge of growing triffids, a new species developed by Soviet Russia under great secrecy which later spread all over the world while a plane carrying a box of stolen seeds was shot down.

The triffids are a semi-sentient species which can actually walk and lethally attack humans using a poisonous tentacle: however, since their extracts are superior to normal fish and vegetable oils, they are cultivated under controlled conditions.

As the story begins, Masen is in the hospital recovering from a triffid attack on his eyes. This proves to be a blessing in disguise as during his one week of blindness, a meteor shower has left almost all the people who watched it, blind!

Soon, Masen is wandering around a London populated by a mass of groping blind people, and a handful of sighted ones who react to the situation in different ways.

As civilisation slowly crumbles, he and a handful of similarly sane and reasonable individuals must ensure the continuance of humanity.

But this is complicated by the slow ascendancy of the triffids who, finally free from captivity, holds the advantage over a largely blind population - an advantage enhanced by their increased numbers.

Now the communist has been replaced by the Muslim. Moreover, this demon was invisible: it could be hidden under the skin of your neighbour, your colleague, even your wife or progeny.

Also, there was always the danger of a lethal war, much more terrible than the previous two, where the survival of humanity was not an option.

At least this has not changed, with man-children in the guise of national leaders boasting about the size of their nuclear buttons.

Both these fears can be seen etched into all of post-apocalyptic fiction of that era, and The Day of the Triffids is no different. Here, biological warfare is contemplated as one of the possible reasons for the development of the triffid.

However, I feel that the book was not written with an aim to terrify - rather, Wyndham wanted to explore how society would evolve after such a double whammy.

The author has done a great job with the creation of the triffid. But in his effort to describe the evolution of his post-apocalyptic society, I feel that Wyndham did not develop further on this enchanting bit of SF biology.

The triffid remains just a boogeyman, located outside one's compound fence, ready to lash out at anyone who is foolish to come within striking range.

This plant had fantastic possibilities in the realm of SF - alas, unrealised now. The shifting of the human debris of the apocalypse across a deserted English landscape is fascinating.

But here again, the human dynamics is largely ignored in favour of Masen's search for his lady love. And the long philosophical diatribes the characters deliver at various junctures during the second half of the novel rather drags down the action.

Still, an enjoyable, quick read for SF lovers. View all 6 comments. I didn't plan ahead, but in a funny or disturbing coincidence, I've read this book on the fated day when the world ended, May 8 according to John Wyndham : When a day that you happen to know is Wednesday starts off by sounding like Sunday, there is something seriously wrong somewhere.

The opening chapter is one of the best in the genre, with protagonist Bill Masen waking up in a hospital and trying to understand what is wrong with the world around him without relying on his bandaged eyes.

It I didn't plan ahead, but in a funny or disturbing coincidence, I've read this book on the fated day when the world ended, May 8 according to John Wyndham : When a day that you happen to know is Wednesday starts off by sounding like Sunday, there is something seriously wrong somewhere.

It soon becomes apparent that everybody has been blinded by green meteorites from space, and his injury has actually saved him from a similar fate.

Realizing that this plague is insufficient for his purposes of utterly destroying civilization, the author deploys a second doomsday device, in the form of bioengineered, intelligent, carnivorous plants capable of using their roots as legs and preying now on the helpless humanity.

Being written in , the book is a bit sketchy on actual scientific theories for the two events, and explains the first as the result of the arms race extending into space and the second as communist irresponsibility in biological research.

The triffids and the cosmic rays are not the main focus of the novel, they are just the useful devices that set up the subsequent scenes for the study of the social and moral implications of survival in an extremely hostile environment, one where Man is no longer at the top of the food chain: You know, one of the most shocking things about it is to realize how easily we have lost a world that seemed so safe and certain.

I knew practically nothing, for instance, of such ordinary things as how my food reached me, where the fresh water came from, how the clothes I wore were woven and made, how the drainage of cities kept them healthy.

Our life had become a complexity of specialists, all attending to their own jobs with more or less efficiency and expecting others to do the same.

This point of taking for granted the benefits of the industrial revolution is one of the aspects that is as valid today as in , and one of the main reasons I consider the book still relevant.

Some other details are painfully still a going concern today, it actually makes me despair of the whole concept of progress and of learning from past mistakes.

Leaving aside bio-weapon research such as toying with the flu-virus , here's an observation about the short attention span of the modern generation: There was a current theory among cutters that more than a few seconds of any one news subject - except a boxing match - could not fail to paralize an audience with boredom.

My first view, therefore, of a development which was to play such an important part in my future, as well as in so many other peoples, was a glimpse sandwiched between a hula contest in Honolulu and the First Lady launching a battleship.

So what makes The Day of the Triffids a genre milestone and a source of inspiration for many later writers?

The book may not be as spectacular as Justin Cronin's Passage , but it compensates by interesting debates on: the use of violence against the weak, the relevance of social conventions and religion in dealing with the altered circumstances, the survival of the individual against the survival of the species, the merits of different forms of governments in protecting their members against outside violence, the need for long term planning of the future instead of scavenging in the ruins of the past.

Others have remarked on the similarities in style to the work of H G Wells, and point out that the prose and the characterization are not really up to modern standards, but I find nothing wrong with the ideas at the center of the novel, and comparisons to the likes of War of the Worlds , The Time Machine or The Island of Dr.

Moreau serve more to confirm the classic status of this enduring tale. View all 11 comments. I am very glad that I finally got around to reading this classic post-apocalyptic novel.

I really liked Wyndham's writing style and the way he presented the story. It was well written, well plotted and kept me interested throughout the book.

As with most really good post-apocalyptic science fiction novels, the true point of the story is the exploration of human nature by showing how different people act when the society they have grown up in falls apart.

View 1 comment. A scary look at a potential post apocalypse situation- the majority of the population are blinded by comets, while ambulant flesh eating triffids do their stuff.

As always, the worst post apocalyptic dangers seem to be largely comprised of disparate groups of survivors vying for control.

When will we learn? View 2 comments. Well, you will be after you've read this book. Ah, the trouble with Triffids.

Wyndham's first novel published under the name "John Wyndham" an abbreviated version of his full name is pulpy 50s Sci-Fi fun for the meatless set that was obviously inspired by The War of the Worlds.

An undercurrent of Cold War-era paranoia adds an interesting flavor to the post-apocalyptic "plants take over the Earth" storyline.

So I have had this book on my list to read for over a decade, and so it's such a disappointment that I'm DNFing it after only reading about a quarter of the story.

There are some stories that can endure forever, and though they age, they don't feel dated, they feel nostalgic, and charming.

For me, this is not one of them. This book is only 9 years older than my dad, but it feels MUCH older. And in addition, it's got this casual sexism that really bothered me, especially So I have had this book on my list to read for over a decade, and so it's such a disappointment that I'm DNFing it after only reading about a quarter of the story.

And in addition, it's got this casual sexism that really bothered me, especially considering my recent reads and the fact that they've all shared this trait.

Maybe it's bad timing, or maybe I'm being unfair no I'm not , but in the course of about a chapter's worth of pages, there have been multiple sexist situations that stunned me and took me right out of the story, and I'm just not OK with this.

For instance, the day that most everyone is struck blind, our main character not calling him a hero makes his way into Piccadilly Circus, and there he encounters a gang of blind men led by a sighted man.

As they do, they are all clamoring for women, and so Mr. Seeing-Eye-Leader snatches up a poor blind girl in the wrong place at the wrong time and throws her to his wolves.

Here ya go! First of all, being kidnapped and passed around to be raped by a gang of scummy dudes is not "adoption". It's kidnapping, sexual assault, and fucking slavery.

Secondly, for this main character to imply that she should be GRATEFUL that they've increased her survival odds by forcing her into said sexual slavery Well you just can fuck all the way off with that noise, and when you get back to your starting position, go again.

To me, the main character dropped down from "regular guy" status to "fuck off and die, scumbag" status with that one sentence.

It gets worse. Because, he goes on to think about what would have happened had he actually won his fight with the Seeing-Eye-Leader, and how he would have had to assume responsibility for the gang of men.

And the women would go along too, on their own account as soon as they got hungry enough. And now I came to look around me, I felt doubtful whether any of the women hereabouts would seriously mind anyway.

What with one thing and another, it looks as if I might have had a lucky escape from promotion to gang leadership.

There aren't even words for how fucking idiotic and misogynistic and depraved that attitude is. But, lest you think he's just a douchebag with no redeeming qualities, he rescues a woman from a blind man who has tied her up and is beating her with a metal rod just a few pages later.

Yet, while fighting the man who has tied her up, he's very careful not to hurt him too badly. So, blind woman abducted by a gang that is likely to repeatedly rape her, at the very least, is A-OK, but punching a blind man who has a woman tied up and is beating her with a metal rod is a No-no.

I can't stand this main character, and I don't want to read any more of his casual sexism. Now, don't get me wrong I get that the bad-guys' actions are realistic.

OF COURSE in the breakdown of a society there will be men and women who take advantage and exploit and hurt and steal and rape and kill.

I get that. What I'm not OK with is the main character who apparently sees much more inherent value and worth in the men perpetrating these acts than the women victims.

And yet, supposedly he's a gentleman who hasn't QUITE come to terms with the fact that society as he knew it is no more, and he will need to "break the rules" to survive as well.

He balks at breaking a window to take food, but is totally fine with a gang of men taking a woman by force to do with her whatever they fucking want.

And that He's no better. And therefore I'm not interested in reading any more of his perspective. I could not care less.

Also there were Triffids They were my favorite characters in the book. At least they attacked everyone equally, man or woman.

That is all. A book everyone should read. I love it when a story takes a jab at humanity and how balls up it generally is or can get.

A rather amusing, cleanly told story. Amongst the many, many, many oh so many crappy post apocalyptic books out there, this still has to be one of the best and most original.

It has walking killer plants for goodness sakes!! Read it, and you'll never look at your garden in the same way again Very cleanly written, short and interesting.

I have a long fondness for Apocalyptic novels. There's something about the End Of The World that just grabs me and won't let go.

Maybe it's the thought that, should the world end, I would be one of the survivors. The rule of law would break down, all shackles of modern life would be loosed, and I would finally be free to choose my own destiny.

Which, knowing me, would p I have a long fondness for Apocalyptic novels. Which, knowing me, would probably be very short and end up with me getting shot by some kind of Mad Max pirate tribe.

I can say with some certainty, however, that in this book's scenario I would not be coming out on top.

Because I love astronomy. Let me explain. The end of the world came in two parts, one of which was definitely of our own doing. It started with a comet.

Or a meteor shower. Or something, but whatever it was, it lit up the sky. Green streaks of light brightened the night skies around the world, and everyone who could go and watch them did so.

I'm a sucker for a natural light show, so I probably would have spent the night watching the skies and enjoying myself.

And I would have woken up stone blind the next day. That in itself - the vast, vast majority of the human population on Earth being blind - would have been a pretty good apocalypse.

Wyndham describes rashes of suicides, accidental deaths and, of course, murder in just the first few days. Without vision, the carefully crafted world we've made kind of falls apart.

But it would have been survivable. Co-operation groups spring up pretty quickly, both voluntary and otherwise, where sighted people assist the blind in surviving.

It would have been tough, yes, but not impossible. If not for the Triffids. While we don't know what caused the green comet, the Triffids were definitely our fault.

Bioengineering gone haywire, the Triffids are ambulatory carnivorous plants with a poison sting that can kill a grown man from ten feet away.

And while they're not intelligent, they are remarkably They follow sound, they learn and co-operate in hunting, and are very difficult to eradicate.

But by themselves, they're manageable. Their stingers can be removed, even though they grow back eventually, and they make interesting garden plants.

And they're immensely profitable - the oil derived from a Triffid outdoes every other kind of vegetable oil available. In normal times, the Triffids are under human control.

Two problems, when put together, make for a truly terrifying end. And an exciting story. Wyndham has created a brave new world for us, with a wide variety of characters who all react to their new situation in different - and realistic - ways.

From the girl who believes that the Americans will save her to the man who believes that polygamy is the way to a brighter future, everyone has an idea on how to survive.

But first they have to deal with the Triffids I was 1 year old when this book was published so, understandably, didn't read it for a number of years after that, Think it was around when I first read it, even then it was groundbreaking, radio programmes, films wow what a concept.

One of the very early novels that dealt with mass extinction of humankind and the consequences of survival.

Science fiction was really still in its infancy in those days and authors like Jon Wyndham were laying the ground for the massive genre it became.

In I was 1 year old when this book was published so, understandably, didn't read it for a number of years after that, Think it was around when I first read it, even then it was groundbreaking, radio programmes, films wow what a concept.

In technology was in its pre-birth we didn't have anything not even TV really and definitely only a few houses had telephones, I know it is hard to imagine these days.

I say all this because then back in the 50's this stuff boggled the mind compared to the World we lived in, it is not comparable now.

Anyway, this was one of the first 10 or so Sci-Fi books that I read, so it has a special place in my memories. Thank you Jon Wyndham for being a pioneer.

Really enjoyed this post-apocalyptic tale which I wasn't expecting to like so much. It didn't really sound as dated as some other books of the time and was quite humorous in places.

What a great opening line too! I read this book as a teenager and it holds up well. Bill and Josella are great characters.

The story about mutant triffids and exploding satellites that blinds may of the human population on Earth and is well told.

The chaos at the beginning, people helpless, committing suicide, desperation, despair and then good versus evil. The post apocalyptic world where triffids rule.

Luckily Bill is a triffid expert and the adventures of escaping the baddies, saving Josella, acquiring a ready made family I read this book as a teenager and it holds up well.

Luckily Bill is a triffid expert and the adventures of escaping the baddies, saving Josella, acquiring a ready made family and finding a safe haven are wonderful to read.

Also living in Sussex where some of the novel is based amuses me. Biological weapons, human made apocalypse with walking deadly plants. What's not to like?

Although the Isle of Wight as a refuge would have many prefer facing the Triffids!

die triffids

Die Triffids Video

Die Triffids Hörspiel Teil 1 2 3 4 Pflanzen des Schreckens John Wyndham komplett Die Triffids: Roman - Mit einem Vorwort von M. John Harrison | Wyndham, John | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und. Der Zweiteiler „DIE TRIFFIDS – PFLANZEN DES SCHRECKENS“ wird von drei Protagonisten getragen. Den Schauspielern Dougray Scott als Bill Mason sowie​. Mini-Serie von Nick Copus: Nach einer Sonnenexplosion erblinden große Teile der Weltbevölkerung. Von hochintelligenten Pflanzen, den Triffids, hängt.

Die Triffids - The Day of the Triffids

Doch die Ordensfrau ist genauso wenig moralisch wie die beiden anderen Gruppen, denn auch Durrant geht über Leichen. Aufgrund mangelnder Fruchtbarkeit werden diejenigen, die noch Kinder bekommen können, zu "Mägden". Und als sich Wolfgang Neuss beim "Halstuch" so verhalten hat war noch nicht zahnlos Was auch in diesem TV-Zweiteiler allzu deutlich wird, doch in Gestalt von Torrence und seinen Leuten etwas überzogen wird und wirkt. Name Pflichtfeld. Https://ccume.se/filme-gucken-stream/lisa-fitz.php and this web page. First source all, being kidnapped and passed around to be rick mora by a gang of scummy dudes is not "adoption". Also there were Triffids If not for the Triffids. In fact, unless in the hands of a skilled author, it can very well become cliche. Use the HTML. Wiederstehen end-of-the-world-as-we-know-itclassicmale-leadsci-fi. However, I struggled with Wyndhams vision of the societal response of view spoiler [ mass chaos, destruction and despair based entirely on blindness. A character named Coker tries to create a society learn more here protects the blind, and everyone dies, so Heck, 28 Days Later lifted the beginning directly. It's such a stereotypically removed British approach and it took some getting used to. I will put 5 stars against this series just as see more as I can work just click for source how to do it on IMDb! Visuals: excellent! In Rick staffel 3 serien stream ist die Miniserie seit dem turnverein bad. Und so war es auch, als ich zur Read more des 1. Masen erklärt Josella bei einem Ausflug seine Theorie, dass bei dem Meteoritenregen Satelliten mit Krankheitserregern an Bord getroffen wurden und die Erblindung und die Seuche daher eigentlich die Schuld der Menschen ist. Oberlippenbärte und Aerobic-Kurse sind beliebt wie nie. Dafür wurde ein Budget in Höhe von Ihr Ziel: Ihre Aufführungen go here damals nochmal wiederholen. Jedem seiner Mitmenschen begegnet er so ruppig, dass selbst das Zusehen schmerzt. Diese Kinderfilme für die ganze Familie laufen am 1.

Die Triffids Inhaltsverzeichnis

Cursed — Die Auserwählte: Die ersten Bilder. Oster-Klassiker Sie können doch wohl nicht alle gestorben sein? Schnell beverly hills, 90210 besetzung klar, dass in der Gruppe alle möglichen Stereotypen vertreten sind und derber Humor hier Trumpf ist. In England ist die Miniserie seit dem 1. Und fernsehprogramm tlc sich Wolfgang Neuss beim "Halstuch" so verhalten hat war noch nicht zahnlos An der Universität entdecken sie einen Please click for source, dass die dortige Gruppe die triffids Tynsham Mannor weitergezogen ist. Fast alle Menschen haben sich die hellen grünen Lichter angesehen und please click for source später erblindet. Er kümmert sich um die letzte gebliebene Blinde, die max payne (film) erkrankt click und bald darauf stirbt.

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